Our Story
About

A Fort Worth icon, Colonial Country Club offers a truly distinctive private club experience accompanied by the character, heritage and dynamic pursuit of excellence that has made Colonial legendary. As a member or guest, you'll always feel a warmhearted invitation to form genuine connections and enjoy Colonial as a home away from home.

The club offers a stunning environment to gather, dine, and pursue your passions, whatever they may be. All while cultivating community and building upon the tradition of excellence that has defined Colonial since it was established in 1936.

Marvin Leonard's Vision Committed to Excellence

Founded on the principles of excellence and community, the club's unwavering commitment to championship golf is matched only by our dedication to creating unforgettable moments that draw families and friends closer together.

Over 80 Years of Championship Golf
January 1936
January 1936 1936

Colonial Club and championship golf arrives in Fort Worth.

Visionary and businessman, Marvin Leonard, establishes "Colonial Club" as it was known in 1936 a family-oriented private club with a championship golf course featuring the first ever bentgrass greens in Texas. Marvin Leonard gives "Colonial Club" it's name from the architectural style of the clubhouse.

June 1941
June 1941 1941

Colonial hosted the 1941 U.S. Open and Craig Wood was named Champion.

Thanks to the determination and perseverance of founder Marvin Leonard, Colonial earned its rightful place in golf history as a championship venue for golf's legends.

December 1942
December 1942 1942

Marvin Leonard sold the club to its members at cost.

August 1943
August 1943 1943

Colonial clubhouse catches fire.

After an electrical fire severely damaged the building and destroyed the kitchen, Leonard prepared and delivered meals to the club so members could still enjoy their Sunday brunch tradition together on the front lawn. As the club began to rebuild they had to get creative construction materials were restricted or unavailable due to the war. So they purchased an old schoolhouse from Stamford, Texas and repurposed the materials for the build.

May 1946
May 1946 1946

Hometown legend, Ben Hogan, wins the inaugural Colonial National Invitational.

Undoubtedly two of the best golfers of all time, Hogan beat Sam Snead with a score of 65 in the final round to win his first of five Colonial Invitational tournaments.

April 1952
April 1952 1952

Colonial introduces the Tartan Jacket Tradition.

Winners of the Colonial National Invitation are awarded a Scottish tartan jacket. A symbol now synonymous with Colonial and golf's greatest champions.

April 1953
April 1953 1953

Clubhouse fire destroys the original Colonial building.

With the help of members, Colonial hosted a PGA Tour event just one month later. "The course is still there, so we will play," club officials declared, using a tent as the clubhouse. Hometown hero Ben Hogan won.

October 1955
October 1955 1955

The clubhouse reopens.

After nearly two years, the doors open to members and guests. The iconic red-brick clubhouse and Colonial Columns still stand today.

May 1962
May 1962 1962

Arnold Palmer wins Colonial National Invitation.

After winning five tournaments including the Masters, Palmer captured his sixth win at Colonial and went on to become PGA Player of the Year.

May 1964
May 1964 1964

Colonial National Invitation is broadcast on national TV.

For the first time, tournament coverage for Saturday and Sunday airs on ABC.

August 1975
August 1975 1975

Colonial hosts the second annual Tournament Players Championship.

The famous Wall of Champions makes its debut on the first tee.

May 1982
May 1982 1982

Colonial National Invitation reaches one million in ticket sales.

A legendary year for the tournament. Jack Nicklaus returned after a six-year hiatus to win.

February 1986
February 1986 1986

Colonial named one of the "Ten Most Prestigious Tournaments in Golf"

In a Pro Survey by GOLF Magazine, PGA players revere the course and competition at the Colonial National Invitation.

May 1997
May 1997 1997

Tiger Woods plays Colonial.

Fresh off his 12-stroke victory in the Masters at the age of 21, Tiger finished 4th in his appearance at the Colonial National Invitation.

May 2003
May 2003 2003

Annika Sorenstam is the first woman to play in a PGA Tour event since 1945.

Already an LPGA superstar, Annika tested her game against the talented field, playing from the same tees against an all-male field. She missed the 36-hole cut by 4 strokes, but earned the respect of many and carried on a record-breaking career that landed her in the Hall of Fame.

January 2018
January 2018 2018

Colonial tournament renamed Fort Worth Invitational.

Honoring the historic community effort by Fort Worth civic and business leaders to hold the tournament without a host and keeping the legacy of hosting the longest running tournament at the same location alive.

June 2023
June 2023 2023

Restoration begins on the famed Colonial golf course.

Highly acclaimed golf course designer Gil Hanse takes the reins on course restorations, scheduled to debut at the 2024 PGA Tour event, the Charles Schwab Challenge.

1936
1941
1942
1943
1946
1952
1953
1955
1962
1964
1975
1982
1986
1997
2003
2018
2023
Wall of Champions Historic Ground

1946: Ben Hogan (World Golf Hall of Fame), 1947: Ben Hogan (WGHF), 1948: Clayton Heafner, 1949: No Tournament due to Flooding, 1950: Sam Snead (WGHF), 1951: Cary Middlecoff (WGHF), 1952: Ben Hogan (WGHF), 1953: Ben Hogan (WGHF), 1954: Johnny Palmer, 1955: Chandler Harper, 1956: Mike Souchak, 1957: Roberto De Vicenzo, 1958: Tommy Bolt (WGHF), 1959: Ben Hogan (WGHF), 1960: Julius Boros (WGHF), 1961: Doug Sanders, 1962: Arnold Palmer (WGHF), 1963: Julius Boros (WGHF), 1964: Billy Casper (WGHF), 1965: Bruce Crampton, 1966: Bruce Devlin, 1967: Dave Stockton, 1968: Billy Casper (WGHF), 1969: Gardner Dickinson, 1970: Homero Blancas, 1971: Gene Littler (WGHF), 1972: Jerry Heard, 1973: Tom Weiskopf, 1974: Rod Curl, 1975: Al Geiberger, 1976: Lee Trevino (WGHF), 1977: Ben Crenshaw (WGHF), 1978: Lee Trevino (WGHF), 1979: Al Geiberger, 1980: Bruce Lietzke, 1981: Fuzzy Zoeller, 1982: Jack Nicklaus (WGHF), 1983: Jim Colbert, 1984: Peter Jacobsen, 1985: Corey Pavin, 1986: Dan Pohl, 1987: Keith Clearwater, 1988: Lanny Wadkins (WGHF), 1989: Ian Baker-Finch, 1990: Ben Crenshaw (WGHF), 1991: Tom Purtzer, 1992: Bruce Lietzke, 1993: Fulton Allem, 1994: Nick Price (WGHF), 1995: Tom Lehman, 1996: Corey Pavin, 1997: David Frost, 1988: Tom Watson (WGHF), 1999: Olin Browne, 2000: Phil Mickelson (WGHF), 2001: Sergio Garcia, 2002: Nick Price (WGHF), 2003: Kenny Perry, 2004: Steve Flesch, 2005: Kenny Perry, 2006: Tim Herron, 2007: Rory Sabbatini, 2008: Phil Mickelson (WGHF), 2009: Steve Stricker, 2010: Zach Johnson, 2011: David Toms, 2012: Zach Johnson, 2013: Boo Weekley, 2014: Adam Scott, 2015: Chris Kirk, 2016: Jordan Spieth, 2017: Kevin Kisner, 2018: Justin Rose, 2019: Kevin Na, 2020: Daniel Berger, 2021: Jason Kokrak, 2022: Sam Burns, 2023: Emiliano Grillo

Our Storied History